Tag Archives: business model innovation

Screw AppleWatch. Give me LYF!

Lordy, is it really 4 months since I last posted? Shame on me!

Well, it’s only fitting that I should break such a prolonged period of radio silence with news from my favourite discovery of 2014: the brilliant LYF Shoes.

If you haven’t come across this little gem before, clear 15 mins in your calendar to watch LYF founder Aly Khalifa’s talk from the Sustainable Brands conference in London last November. Seriously, do it. The design – not only of the product, but also the entire ecosystem and customer experience it spawns – is genuinely breathtaking in its scale and ingenuity and, as you pause and reflect on it, you’ll wonder why shoes would ever be made any other way in this day and age.

That’s why I couldn’t be happier to be one of the lucky few to be involved as an LYF Pioneer, shortly to receive my ‘LYF Fit Kit’ and begin the journey towards my first ever pair of custom-fit, one-of-a-kind, made-to-be-made-again footwear.

This may be the first time in my life that I’ve ever truly been an Early Adopter. I couldn’t give a stuff about all the hype surrounding the latest gadgets, like the AppleWatch, but LYF is different.

You see, I’m a sucker for anything to do with sustainability-inspired innovation, and the chance to play some small part in the development an enterprise with the potential to disrupt an entire industry is simply too good to miss. I also happen to be 6’7″ with size 14 feet, which means I’ve struggled for pretty much all of my adult life to find clothes – and especially shoes – that fit.

LYF, with me at least, has hit the mother of all sweet spots!

I’ll let others rave about the opportunity to design their own uppers and create a truly individual fashion statement (I am, after all, a 42-year old straight white male, which makes me something of a fashion vacuum).

What really intrigues me is the chance, for the first time ever, to own a pair of shoes that has been individually customised to the length and width of each of my feet (that’s right, folks, different sized feet receive different sized shoes!); more than that, to own a pair of shoes that will actually capture biomechanical data on the way I walk, using a device embedded in the heel, so that the design of the next pair I buy will be refined to fit even better; and all serviced by a closed-loop, circular business model that eliminates harmful substances from assembly, uses 100% recyclable materials, and spurs local economic development by encouraging micro-enterprises to spring up and fulfil all parts of the value cycle from Original Equipment Manufacture to assembly and retail.

Normally it’s my missus who has the exclusive preserve on getting excited about a pair of shoes but, on this occasion, I’ll gladly buck the trend.

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Sustainability-inspired disruption: LYF Shoes

Traditional shoe-making is a nasty business, explains a video from LYF Shoes.

Cheap raw materials, exploitation of foreign labour, toxic adhesives and mega-heat ovens used in assembly, wasteful packaging, long-distance shipping and distribution… That’s a very long list of negative effects for the making and use of a product that, in the vast majority of cases, is ultimately destined for landfill.

Of course, all of this makes it an industry ripe for disruptive innovation. There has to be a better way, right?

Well, LYF Shoes (Love Your Fit. Love Your Fashion. Love Your Footprint.) looks like they may have found it – not just a product with a sustainable twist (a la Oat Shoes), mind you, but an entire sustainable system of design, production, distribution and consumption. A new and disruptively innovative business model.

Ready for the whistle-stop tour? Here are some of the headlines, viewed through the lens of the fundamental principles of design for sustainability, as described in my book

Clever!

Material inputs: How might you redesign products and processes to reduce the amount and types of materials used? Are those materials recyclable, so that waste is no longer waste, but the food for another process? Could your raw materials come from someone else’s waste (or your waste become someone else’s raw material)?

LYF shoes are designed from the ground up to use 100% recyclable materials – from the recycled rubber and plastics in the sole and ‘performance plate’, to the cork insoles (the cork coming from recycled wine bottles), to the all-natural uppers. What’s more, those uppers are precision-cut and printed on-demand, using an all-dry digital printing process, so as to minimize ink and material waste.

Very clever!

Modularity and longevity: What is the expected life span of your product? How easily can it be repaired, updated or put to alternative use? How easy is it to dissemble the product into its component parts to aid that repurposing/updating/re-use?

LYF shoes are specifically designed for ease of assembly and disassembly – five component parts that fit together entirely without glue. That makes it a doddle, either to extend the life of the shoe by replacing a single worn component (no need to throw the baby out with the bathwater) or, if the shoe has given up the ghost completely, to return it to source to be recycled and turned into a new shoe. 

Cleverer still!

Closing the loop: How can you make use of reverse logistics to reclaim discarded outputs and turn them into new inputs? How close are the points of production and consumption? Can these distances be shortened to further increase the efficiency of your value cycle?

Here’s where it gets cleverer still. The simplicity of design and assembly – no glue, no ovens, no screen printing – enables a decentralized model of production and distribution. It paves the way for local microenterprises to spring up to fulfil just about every part of the value cycle – whether that’s Original Equipment Manufacture (OEM – i.e. manufacture of the component parts) or the job of assembly and disassembly at retail.

What’s more, this model slashes the costs and impacts of distribution and packaging by synchronising the points of production and consumption. And with customers incentivised to return end-of-life shoes, by virtue of a buy-back scheme (those shoes easily disassembled at the point of return and their components sent back to OEMs for remanufacture), the LYF model creates a ‘closed loop’ at a local level.

Cleverest of the lot!

Imagine you had absolutely no knowledge of all this ‘under the hood’ stuff. Instead, just pause and reflect on the entirely different customer experience it creates:

  1. You get to design your own shoes – before they’re made! Initially choosing from a range of styles and textile patterns, as the business grows you’ll eventually be able to upload your own print for a truly individual fashion statement. And you get to watch those shoes being made – at the point of retail, in front of your very eyes, in a matter of minutes.
  2. The shoes you receive won’t only be more to your taste in fashion, they’ll be functionally superior too – custom fit, more comfortable (and only getting more comfortable with every subsequent purchase, as an embedded digital capture device tracks biomechanics and builds a user profile that can be used to refine the design).
  3. And if, for whatever reason, those shoes just aren’t doing it for you any more – hey, no problem! Simply return to the store and either have them ‘upgraded’, or trade them in for a new pair, safe in the knowledge that every ounce of materials will go towards make another pair of shoes for someone else.

Seriously, what’s not to love? And if this sort of business model innovation floats your boat as much as it does mine, don’t be shy – go forth and shout about it! Here’s a wee video worth sharing as an introduction to/summary of the LYF story: